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Reviewed work(s): Afro‐Future Females: Black Writers Chart Science Fiction’s Newest New‐Wave Trajectory. Edited by Marleen S. Barr. Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 2008. Feminist Philosophy and Science Fiction: Utopias and Dystopias. Edited by Judith A. Little. Amherst, NY: Prometheus, 2007. Bodies of Tomorrow: Technology, Subjectivity, Science Fiction. By Sherryl Vint. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007. Galactic Suburbia: Recovering Women’s Science Fiction. By Lisa Yaszek. Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 2008. [Book Reviews]

Haran, Joan 2009. Reviewed work(s): Afro‐Future Females: Black Writers Chart Science Fiction’s Newest New‐Wave Trajectory. Edited by Marleen S. Barr. Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 2008. Feminist Philosophy and Science Fiction: Utopias and Dystopias. Edited by Judith A. Little. Amherst, NY: Prometheus, 2007. Bodies of Tomorrow: Technology, Subjectivity, Science Fiction. By Sherryl Vint. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007. Galactic Suburbia: Recovering Women’s Science Fiction. By Lisa Yaszek. Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 2008. [Book Reviews]. SIGNS 34 (4) , pp. 1010-1016. 10.1086/597144

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Abstract

The opportunity to review this assembly of recently published texts is testament to a growing readership for scholarly engagement with science fiction (SF) as well as to the rich resource that science fiction offers to both women’s studies and to feminists working within longer‐established academic disciplines.1 The collection edited by Marleen S. Barr is a somewhat idiosyncratic but nonetheless lively assemblage of fiction, critique, and personal essay that claims to “chart science fiction’s newest new‐wave trajectory” (ix), while the anthology edited by Judith A. Little collects over twenty pieces of short fiction and novel extracts to provide resources for thinking through philosophical issues in the context of gendered utopias and dystopias. Sherryl Vint’s Bodies of Tomorrow draws on feminist philosophy and literary scholarship in close readings of key SF texts published in the last twenty years to make a plea for an ethical posthumanism that takes full account of human embodiment, and Lisa Yaszek’s Galactic Suburbia is a deceptively clear reevaluation of the contribution made to both feminism and science fiction by women writing science fiction after the Second World War and before the women’s liberation movement.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Social Sciences (Includes Criminology and Education)
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > B Philosophy (General)
H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
H Social Sciences > HQ The family. Marriage. Woman
P Language and Literature > PN Literature (General) > PN0080 Criticism
Additional Information: Pdf uploaded in accordance with publisher's policy at http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/0097-9740/ (accessed 21/02/2014).
Publisher: University of Chicago
ISSN: 0097-9740
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 30 March 2016
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2017 03:10
URI: http://orca.cardiff.ac.uk/id/eprint/17738

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