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Lack of change in CA1 dendritic spine density or clustering in rats following training on a radial-arm maze task [version 2; peer review: 2 approved]

Craig, Emma, Dillingham, Christopher M., Milczarek, Michal M., Phillips, Heather M., Davies, Moira, Perry, James C. and Vann, Seralynne D. 2020. Lack of change in CA1 dendritic spine density or clustering in rats following training on a radial-arm maze task [version 2; peer review: 2 approved]. Wellcome Open Research 5 , 68. 10.12688/wellcomeopenres.15745.2

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Abstract

Background: Neuronal plasticity is thought to underlie learning and memory formation. The density of dendritic spines in the CA1 region of the hippocampus has been repeatedly linked to mnemonic processes. Both the number and spatial location of the spines, in terms of proximity to nearest neighbour, have been implicated in memory formation. To examine how spatial training impacts synaptic structure in the hippocampus, Lister-Hooded rats were trained on a hippocampal-dependent spatial task in the radial-arm maze. Methods: One group of rats were trained on a hippocampal-dependent spatial task in the radial arm maze. Two further control groups were included: a yoked group which received the same sensorimotor stimulation in the radial-maze but without a memory load, and home-cage controls. At the end of behavioural training, the brains underwent Golgi staining. Spines on CA1 pyramidal neuron dendrites were imaged and quantitatively assessed to provide measures of density and distance from nearest neighbour. Results: There was no difference across behavioural groups either in terms of spine density or in the clustering of dendritic spines. Conclusions: Spatial learning is not always accompanied by changes in either the density or clustering of dendritic spines on the basal arbour of CA1 pyramidal neurons when assessed using Golgi imaging.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Psychology
Publisher: F1000Research
ISSN: 2398-502X
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 28 July 2020
Date of Acceptance: 15 May 2020
Last Modified: 20 Oct 2021 01:08
URI: http://orca.cardiff.ac.uk/id/eprint/133839

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