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Acceptability of an interactive film-based intervention targeting adolescent boys to prevent sexual risk-taking: findings from the JACK cluster randomised controlled trial process evaluation

Aventin, Áine, French, Rebecca, Young, Honor, McDaid, Lisa, Lewis, Ruth, Warren, Emily, McConnon, Linda and Lohan, Maria 2019. Acceptability of an interactive film-based intervention targeting adolescent boys to prevent sexual risk-taking: findings from the JACK cluster randomised controlled trial process evaluation. The Lancet 394 10.1016/S0140-6736(19)32802-8

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Abstract

Background Global health policy recognises the need for evidence-based interventions to promote positive sexual health among teenage boys. Creative solutions involving digital technologies have potential for engaging boys, but there remains insufficient evidence regarding the acceptability and effectiveness of these methods. We aimed to address this gap by examining the acceptability and feasibility of a coproduced, teacher-delivered intervention that uses interactive film to encourage adolescents to engage in episodic future thinking to help prepare for relationships and sexual health decision making. Methods Acceptability and feasibility of the intervention was determined with a systematic iterative process of intervention development involving a parallel-group feasibility cluster randomised controlled trial with embedded process and cost evaluation, which piloted trial processes and methods in Northern Ireland and a qualitative evaluation of acceptability in England, Scotland, and Wales. The sampling strategy was a maximum variation quota sample and the control group continued with normal practice. Process evaluation data were also collected. Triangulated data were analysed with thematic analysis. Findings Between November, 2014, and December, 2017, eight post-primary schools (831 adolescents, mean age 14·4 years [SE=0·019]) were enrolled into the pilot trial and 13 schools were involved in the qualitative evaluation of acceptability. Process evaluation data were collected from 17 focus groups with adolescents, 30 small focus groups and individual semi-structured interviews with school management staff and teachers, four classroom observations, and a satisfaction survey with 159 pupils. Results showed that the intervention was acceptable to schools, engaging to adolescents and teachers, and could be feasibly and cost-effectively implemented with minor amendments including development of an English version of the film for use in England and Wales, amendment of materials for faith-based schools, and refinement of parental components to include online materials. The satisfaction survey revealed that 100% (n=6) of teachers and 91% (n=145) of adolescents were satisfied with the intervention materials. Recruitment and retention targets were achieved. Of 21 schools approached, 38% (n=8) agreed to take part with no withdrawal. Of 1027 eligible students, and 81% (n=831) were recruited with 93% (n=774) retention. Interpretation Co-produced interactive film that encourages episodic future thinking is an acceptable method of engaging teenage boys in sexual health behaviour change programmes. Further applications of this technique in adolescent public health are possible and, thus far, have included smoking cessation, marijuana use, and future fatherhood in male prisoners. Funding Intervention design and development were funded by The UK Economic and Social Research Council (RES-189-25-0300). The feasibility trial (ISRCTN99459996) was funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Public Health Research programme (15/181/01). The views expressed are those of the authors and not those of the National Health Service, the NIHR, or the Department of Health. The Scottish transferability study was funded by the UK Medical Research Council (MC_UU_12017/11) and the Scottish Government Chief Scientist Office (SPHSU11). The transferability study in Wales and England was funded by the Centre for the Development and Evaluation of Complex Interventions for Public Health Improvement, Cardiff University and University College London.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Social Sciences (Includes Criminology and Education)
Development and Evaluation of Complex Interventions for Public Health Improvement (DECIPHer)
Publisher: Elsevier
ISSN: 0140-6736
Last Modified: 24 May 2021 14:45
URI: http://orca.cardiff.ac.uk/id/eprint/141515

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