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Inequalities in smoking and quitting-related outcomes among adults with and without children in the household 2013-2019: A population survey in England

Kock, Loren, Brown, Jamie, Shahab, Lion, Tattan-Birch, Harry, Moore, Graham and Cox, Sharon 2021. Inequalities in smoking and quitting-related outcomes among adults with and without children in the household 2013-2019: A population survey in England. Nicotine and Tobacco Research , ntab211. 10.1093/ntr/ntab211

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Abstract

Introduction Smoking among those who live with children is an important influence on smoking initiation among children. This study assessed socioeconomic inequalities in smoking and quitting-related outcomes among all adults with and without children in the household. Methods Monthly repeat cross-sectional household survey of adults (16+) from 2013-2019 in England (N=138,583). We assessed the association between cigarette smoking and quitting-related outcomes and having children in the household, and whether these relationships were moderated by occupational social grade (categories AB-E from most to least advantaged). Trends in smoking prevalence among adults with and without children in the household were explored. Results In adjusted analysis, the association of having children in the household with smoking prevalence depended on social grade: smoking prevalence was between 0.71 (95%CI 0.66-0.77) to 0.93 (0.88-0.98) times lower among social grades AB-D with children in the household relative to those without. Conversely, it was 1.11 (1.05-1.16) times higher among social grade E. Yearly prevalence declined similarly among those with and without children (both PR: 0.98, 95%CI 0.97-0.99). Motivation to stop smoking was higher among those with children than those without, but lower among disadvantaged than more advantaged groups. Social grades D-E had greater heavy smoking, but higher prevalence of past-month quit attempts. Conclusions Among the most disadvantaged social grade in England, smoking prevalence was higher in those with children in the household than without. To attenuate future smoking-related inequalities, there is an urgent need to target support and address barriers to quitting and promote longer term quit success.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Published Online
Status: In Press
Schools: Social Sciences (Includes Criminology and Education)
Development and Evaluation of Complex Interventions for Public Health Improvement (DECIPHer)
Additional Information: This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISSN: 1469-994X
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 15 October 2021
Date of Acceptance: 5 October 2021
Last Modified: 19 Oct 2021 05:29
URI: http://orca.cardiff.ac.uk/id/eprint/144872

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