Cardiff University | Prifysgol Caerdydd ORCA
Online Research @ Cardiff 
WelshClear Cookie - decide language by browser settings

Sediment supply as a driver of river meandering and floodplain evolution in the Amazon Basin

Constantine, Jose Antonio, Dunne, Thomas, Ahmed, Joshua, Legleiter, Carl and Lazarus, Eli D. 2014. Sediment supply as a driver of river meandering and floodplain evolution in the Amazon Basin. Nature Geoscience 7 , pp. 899-903. 10.1038/ngeo2282

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

The role of externally imposed sediment supplies on the evolution of meandering rivers and their floodplains is poorly understood, despite analytical advances in our physical understanding of river meandering. The Amazon river basin hosts tributaries that are largely unaffected by engineering controls and hold a range of sediment loads, allowing us to explore the influence that sediment supply has on river evolution. Here we calculate average annual rates of meander migration within 20 reaches in the Amazon Basin from Landsat imagery spanning 1985–2013. We find that rivers with high sediment loads experience annual migration rates that are higher than those of rivers with lower sediment loads. Meander cutoff also occurs more frequently along rivers with higher sediment loads. Differences in meander migration and cutoff rates between the study reaches are not explained by differences in channel slope or river discharge. Because faster meander migration and higher cutoff rates lead to increased sediment-storage space in the resulting oxbows, we suggest that sediment supply modulates the reshaping of floodplain environments by meandering rivers. We conclude that imposed sediment loads influence planform changes in lowland rivers across the Amazon.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Earth and Ocean Sciences
Subjects: Q Science > QE Geology
Publisher: Nature Research
ISSN: 1752-0894
Related URLs:
Date of Acceptance: 3 October 2014
Last Modified: 19 Oct 2021 01:09
URI: http://orca.cardiff.ac.uk/id/eprint/67910

Citation Data

Cited 65 times in Scopus. View in Scopus. Powered By Scopus® Data

Actions (repository staff only)

Edit Item Edit Item