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“Goosebump man. That’s funny!” Humor with siblings and friends from early to middle childhood

Paine, Amy L., Howe, Nina, Gilmore, Victoria, Karajian, Gassiaa and DeHart, Ganie 2021. “Goosebump man. That’s funny!” Humor with siblings and friends from early to middle childhood. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology 77 , 101321. 10.1016/j.appdev.2021.101321

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Abstract

We investigated change and continuity in children's humor production from early to middle childhood with siblings and friends. Sixty-five children (M age = 56.4 months, SD = 5.71) were observed as they played with their older or younger sibling and with a friend in two separate play sessions. Children were observed again approximately three years later (n = 46, M age = 94.6 months; SD = 6.6). Spontaneous humor production was coded in the play sessions. Focal children's humor production did not differ as a function of relationship or time. Children's tendency to produce humor with their sibling at 4 years of age was associated with humor production with a friend, both concurrently and three years later. Our findings draw attention to childhood sibling relationships and friendships as rich contexts for humor and continuities across relationships and time.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Psychology
Additional Information: This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)
Publisher: Elsevier
ISSN: 0193-3973
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 23 August 2021
Date of Acceptance: 19 August 2021
Last Modified: 29 Nov 2021 15:54
URI: https://orca.cardiff.ac.uk/id/eprint/143593

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