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Mixed methods study protocol: Do national reporting and learning system medication incidents in palliative care reflect patient and carer concerns about medication management and safety?

Yardley, Sarah, Francis, Sally-Anne, Chuter, Anthony, Hellard, Stuart, Abernethy, Julia and Carson-Stevens, Andrew 2021. Mixed methods study protocol: Do national reporting and learning system medication incidents in palliative care reflect patient and carer concerns about medication management and safety? BMJ Open 11 (9) 10.1136/bmjopen-2021-048696

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Abstract

Abstract Introduction Approximately 20% of serious safety incidents involving palliative patients relate to medication. These are disproportionately reported when patients are in their usual residence when compared with hospital or hospice. While patient safety incident reporting systems can support professional learning, it is unclear whether these reports encompass patient and carer concerns with palliative medications or interpersonal safety. Aim To explore and compare perceptions of (un)safe palliative medication management from patient, carer and professional perspectives in community, hospital and hospice settings. Methods and analysis We will use an innovative mixed-methods study design combining systematic review searching techniques with cross-sectional quantitative descriptive analysis and interpretative qualitative metasynthesis to integrate three elements: (1) Scoping review: multiple database searches for empirical studies and first-hand experiences in English (no other restrictions) to establish how patients and informal carers conceptualise safety in palliative medication management. (2)Medication incidents from the England and Wales National Reporting and Learning System: identifying and characterising reports to understand professional perspectives on suboptimal palliative medication management. (3) Comparison of 1 and 2: contextualising with stakeholder perspectives. Patient and public involvement Our team includes a funded patient and public involvement (PPI) collaborator, with experience of promoting patient-centred approaches in patient safety research. Funded discussion and dissemination events with PPI and healthcare (clinical and policy) professionals are planned. Ethics and dissemination Prospective ethical approval granted: Cardiff University School of Medicine Research Ethics Committee (Ref 19/28). Our study will synthesise multivoiced constructions of patient safety in palliative care to identify implications for professional learning and actions that are relevant across health and social care. It will also identify changing or escalating patterns in palliative medication incidents due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Peer-reviewed publications, academic presentations, plain English summaries, press releases and social media will be used to disseminate to the public, researchers, clinicians and policy-makers.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Medicine
Additional Information: This is an open access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license
Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group
ISSN: 2044-6055
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 9 September 2021
Date of Acceptance: 13 August 2021
Last Modified: 14 Sep 2021 13:47
URI: https://orca.cardiff.ac.uk/id/eprint/143970

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