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Psychological targets for lung cancer screening uptake: a prospective longitudinal cohort study

Quaife, Samantha L., Waller, JO, Dickson, Jennifer L., Brain, Kate E., Kurtidu, Clara, McCabe, John, Hackshaw, Allan, Duffy, Stephen W. and Janes, Samuel M. 2021. Psychological targets for lung cancer screening uptake: a prospective longitudinal cohort study. Journal of Thoracic Oncology 16 (12) , pp. 2016-2028. 10.1016/j.jtho.2021.07.025
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Abstract

Introduction Low uptake of low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) lung cancer screening by high-risk groups compromises its effectiveness and equity as a population-level early detection strategy. Numerous psychological factors are implicated qualitatively or retrospectively, but prospective data are needed to validate their associations with uptake behaviour and specify psychological targets for intervention. Methods A prospective, longitudinal cohort study examining psychological correlates of lung cancer screening uptake. Ever smokers (aged 55-77) were invited to a Lung Health Check at which LDCT screening was offered through the SUMMIT Study; a multi-centre screening implementation trial. One week after their screening invitation, 44,000 invitees were sent the Self-Regulatory Questionnaire for Lung Cancer Screening. Regression analyses examined the constructs’ associations with uptake (telephoning for an appointment) and sociodemographic characteristics. Results Higher odds of uptake were associated with both positive and negative perceptions. Positive perceptions included lung cancer controllability, benefits of early diagnosis, improved survival when lung cancer is detected early, willingness to be treated, and believing smoking cessation is effective in reducing risk. Negative perceptions included a higher lung cancer risk perception, negative beliefs about the consequences of lung cancer, perceiving lung cancer as stigmatised, and a negative emotional response. While current smokers held the highest risk perceptions, they also reported negative perceptions that could undermine how they behave in response to their risk. Conclusions Interventions to improve uptake should focus on changing perceptions that affect how an individual reacts when they believe their risk of lung cancer is high.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Medicine
Publisher: Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins
ISSN: 1556-0864
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 16 September 2021
Date of Acceptance: 25 July 2021
Last Modified: 25 Jun 2022 05:29
URI: https://orca.cardiff.ac.uk/id/eprint/144177

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