Cardiff University | Prifysgol Caerdydd ORCA
Online Research @ Cardiff 
WelshClear Cookie - decide language by browser settings

Infections in secondary immunodeficiency patients treated with Privigen® or Hizentra®: a retrospective US administrative claims study in patients with hematological malignancies

Mallick, Rajiv, Divino, Victoria, Smith, B. Douglas, Jolles, Stephen, DeKoven, Mitchell and Vinh, Donald C. 2021. Infections in secondary immunodeficiency patients treated with Privigen® or Hizentra®: a retrospective US administrative claims study in patients with hematological malignancies. Leukemia & Lymphoma 62 (14) , pp. 3463-3473. 10.1080/10428194.2021.1961233

[thumbnail of Infections in secondary immunodeficiency patients treated with Privigen or Hizentra a retrospective US administrative claims study in patients with.pdf] PDF - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

Download (1MB)

Abstract

B cell-derived lymphoproliferative disorders are associated with secondary immunodeficiency (SID); some patients require immunoglobulin replacement therapy (IgRT) to mitigate infections. Using IQVIA’s PharMetrics® Plus database, patients with SID who received IgPro10/IgPro20 in the 12 months post-diagnosis (IgRT users) were matched to patients with SID not receiving IgRT (non-IgRT users). The risk of severe infection was compared using within-patient change from baseline to follow-up as well as between cohorts. Overall, 277 IgRT users were matched to 1019 non-IgRT users. Before IgRT, more IgRT users experienced any bacterial infection (88.4% vs. 72.9%; p<.0001) or ≥1 severe bacterial infection (SBI) (42.2% vs. 31.8%; p=.0011) vs. non-IgRT users. During follow-up, risk of SBI among IgRT users (21.7%) reached parity with non-IgRT users (21.2%). IgRT was associated with a reduction in SBIs to levels comparable with the lower ‘baseline infection risk’ of non-IgRT users. These criteria help define SID patients who may benefit from IgRT.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Medicine
Additional Information: This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/)
Publisher: Taylor and Francis
ISSN: 1042-8194
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 30 September 2021
Date of Acceptance: 22 July 2021
Last Modified: 10 Jan 2022 13:20
URI: https://orca.cardiff.ac.uk/id/eprint/144490

Actions (repository staff only)

Edit Item Edit Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics