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A nurse-led home-visitation programme for first-time mothers in reducing maltreatment and improving child health and development (BB:2-6): longer-term outcomes from a randomised cohort using data-linkage

Robling, Michael, Lugg-Widger, Fiona, Cannings-John, Rebecca, Angel, Lianna, Channon, Susan, Fitzsimmons, Deborah, Hood, Kerenza, Kendre, Joyce, Moody, Gwenllian, Owen-Jones, Eleri, Pockett, Rhys, Sanders, Julia, Segrott, Jeremy and Slater, Thomas 2022. A nurse-led home-visitation programme for first-time mothers in reducing maltreatment and improving child health and development (BB:2-6): longer-term outcomes from a randomised cohort using data-linkage. BMJ Open 12 (2) , e049960. 10.1136/bmjopen-2021-049960

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Abstract

Objectives Measure effectiveness of family nurse partnership (FNP) home-visiting programme in reducing maltreatment and improving maternal health and child health, developmental and educational outcomes; explore effect moderators, mediators; describe costs. Design Follow-up of BB:0–2 trial cohort (ISRCTN:23019866) up to age 7 years in England using record linkage. Participants 1618 mothers aged 19 years or younger and their firstborn child(ren) recruited to BB:0–2 trial at less than 25 weeks gestation and not mandatorily withdrawn from trial or opted out. Intervention families were offered up to a maximum of 64 home visits by specially trained nurses from pregnancy until firstborn child was 2 years old, plus usually provided health and social care support. Comparator was usual care alone. Outcome measures Primary outcome: state-verified child-in-need status recorded at any time during follow-up. Secondary outcomes: referral to social services, child protection registration (plan), child-in-need categorisation, looked-after status, recorded injuries and ingestions any time during follow-up, early childcare and educational attendance, school readiness and attainment at key stage 1 (KS1), healthcare costs. Results Match rates for 1547 eligible children (1517 singletons, 15 sets of twins) were 98.3% (NHS Digital) and 97.4% (National Pupil Database). There was no difference between study arms in the proportion of children being registered as in need (adjusted OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.74 to 1.31), or for any other measure of maltreatment. Children in the FNP arm were more likely to achieve a good level of development at reception age (school readiness) (adjusted OR 1.24, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.52). After adjusting for birth month, children in FNP arm were more likely to reach the expected standard in reading at KS1 (adjusted OR 1.26, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.57). We found no trial arm differences for resource use and costs. Conclusions FNP did not improve maltreatment or maternal outcomes. There was evidence of small advantages in school readiness and attainment at KS1.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Social Sciences (Includes Criminology and Education)
Medicine
Centre for Trials Research (CNTRR)
Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group
ISSN: 2044-6055
Funders: Health and Care Resarch Wales and Cancer Research UK
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 2 February 2022
Date of Acceptance: 20 January 2022
Last Modified: 28 Feb 2022 15:33
URI: https://orca.cardiff.ac.uk/id/eprint/147110

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