Cardiff University | Prifysgol Caerdydd ORCA
Online Research @ Cardiff 
WelshClear Cookie - decide language by browser settings

How did levels of psychological distress and perceptions of workplace support among children’s social work staff change during the Covid-19 pandemic?

Jones, Rebecca, Wilkins, David ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2780-0385, Bezeczky, Zoe and Thompson, Sarah 2022. How did levels of psychological distress and perceptions of workplace support among children’s social work staff change during the Covid-19 pandemic? British Journal of Social Work 10.1093/bjsw/bcac126
Item availability restricted.

[thumbnail of Jones, Rebecca_How did levels of psychological distress.pdf] PDF - Accepted Post-Print Version
Restricted to Repository staff only until 7 July 2024 due to copyright restrictions.

Download (381kB)

Abstract

Covid-19 brought about drastic changes in day-to-day life and working practices, and had a profound impact on the mental health and well-being of the general population. Certain professional groups have also been particularly affected. This study sought to explore how levels of psychological distress and perceptions of workplace support amongst social work staff changed during the pandemic. We present the results from a series of surveys conducted in four local authorities (LAs) in England, before and during the Covid-19 pandemic. Social workers and other social care staff (n = 62) were asked about their experiences of psychological distress, using the twelve-item General Health Questionnaire. Overall, we found the proportion of staff reporting elevated levels of psychological distress increased and, in line with previous studies involving social workers, was high relative to the general population. Yet, most staff also said they had high levels of support from managers and colleagues, whilst a small proportion reported an increased perception of workplace support during the pandemic, compared to before. We consider these findings in relation to Organisational Support Theory and reflect on the ability of LAs to provide effective support for social care staff.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Published Online
Status: In Press
Schools: Social Sciences (Includes Criminology and Education)
Children’s Social Care Research and Development Centre (CASCADE)
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISSN: 0045-3102
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 13 July 2022
Date of Acceptance: 9 June 2022
Last Modified: 10 Nov 2022 19:45
URI: https://orca.cardiff.ac.uk/id/eprint/151277

Actions (repository staff only)

Edit Item Edit Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics