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A descriptive cross-sectional international study to explore current practices in the assessment, prevention and treatment of skin tears

LeBlanc, Kimberly, Baranoski, Sharon, Holloway, Samantha, Langemo, Diane and Regan, Mary 2014. A descriptive cross-sectional international study to explore current practices in the assessment, prevention and treatment of skin tears. International Wound Journal 11 (4) , pp. 424-430. 10.1111/iwj.12203

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Abstract

This study presents the results of a descriptive, cross-sectional, online international survey in order to explore current practices in the assessment, prediction, prevention and treatment of skin tears (STs). A total of 1127 health care providers (HCP) from 16 countries completed the survey. The majority of the respondents (69·6%, n = 695) reported problems with the current methods for the assessment and documentation of STs with an overwhelming majority (89·5%, n = 891) favouring the development of a simplified method of assessment. Respondents ranked equipment injury during patient transfer and falls as the main causes of STs. The majority of the samples indicated that they used non-adhesive dressings (35·89%, n = 322) to treat a ST, with the use of protective clothing being the most common method of prevention. The results of this study led to the establishment of a consensus document, classification system and a tool kit for use by practitioners. The authors believe that this survey was an important first step in raising the global awareness of STs and to stimulate discussion and research of these complex acute wounds.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Medicine
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN: 1742-4801
Date of Acceptance: 20 November 2013
Last Modified: 27 Mar 2019 12:16
URI: https://orca.cardiff.ac.uk/id/eprint/79065

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