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Cryogel biomaterials for neuroscience applications

Eigel, Dimitri, Werner, Carsten and Newland, Ben 2021. Cryogel biomaterials for neuroscience applications. Neurochemistry International 147 , 105012. 10.1016/j.neuint.2021.105012
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Abstract

Biomaterials in the form of 3D polymeric scaffolds have been used to create structurally and functionally biomimetic constructs of nervous system tissue. Such constructs can be used to model defects and disease or can be used to supplement neuronal tissue regeneration and repair. One such group of biomaterial scaffolds are hydrogels, which have been widely investigated for cell/tissue culture and as cell or molecule delivery systems in the field of neurosciences. However, a subset of hydrogels called cryogels, have shown to possess several distinct structural advantages over conventional hydrogel networks. Their macroporous structure, created via the time and resource efficient fabrication process (cryogelation) not only allows mass fluid transport throughout the structure, but also creates a high surface area to volume ratio for cell growth or drug loading. In addition, the macroporous structure of cryogels is ideal for applications in the central nervous system as they are very soft and spongey, yet also robust, which makes them a user-friendly and reproducible tool to address neuroscience challenges. In this review, we aim to provide the neuroscience community, who may not be familiar with the fundamental concepts of cryogels, an accessible summary of the basic information that pertain to their use in the brain and nervous tissue. We hope that this review shall initiate creative ways that cryogels could be further adapted and employed to tackle unsolved neuroscience challenges.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Pharmacy
Publisher: Elsevier
ISSN: 0197-0186
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 5 July 2021
Date of Acceptance: 3 March 2021
Last Modified: 07 Jul 2021 11:15
URI: http://orca.cardiff.ac.uk/id/eprint/142390

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